Posts Tagged ‘Study’

3rd Year Nerd Fest

// February 8th, 2011 // No Comments » // Geekery, Study

If anyone is interested, here’s the subjects I’m doing in the third year of my B.Sc. at Sydney Uni.

BIOL3027 – BIOINFORMATICS AND GENOMICS
A unit of study comprising lectures, practical assignments and tutorials on the application of bioinformatics to the storage, retrieval and analysis of biological information, principally in the form of nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Although the main emphasis is on sequence data, other forms of biological information are considered.The unit begins with the assembly and management of nucleotide sequence data and an introduction to the databases that are normally used for the storage and retrieval of biological data, and continues with signal detection and analysis of deduced products, sequence alignment, and database search methods. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on distance-based methods, parsimony methods and maximum-likelihood methods is described and students are introduced to the idea of tree-space, phylogenetic uncertainty, and taught to evaluate phylogenetic trees and identify factors that will confound phylogenetic inference. Finally, whole genome analysis and comparative genomics are considered. The unit gives students an appreciation of the significance of bioinformatics in contemporary biological science by equipping them with skills in the use of a core set of programs and databases for “in silico” biology, and an awareness of the breadth of bioinformatics resources and applications.

BIOL3018 – APPLICATIONS OF RECOMBINANT DNA TECHNOLOGY
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the impact and implications of genetic engineering. Topics include the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines including human gene therapy, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, the transformation of animal and plant cells, the genetic engineering of animals and plants, and the environmental release of genetically-modified (transgenic) organisms. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and computer analysis of gene sequences, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.

NEUR3001 – NEUROSCIENCE: SPECIAL SENSES
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.

NEUR3002 – NEUROSCIENCE: MOTOR SYSTEMS & BEHAVIOUR
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.

Daunted.

// September 2nd, 2010 // No Comments » // Study

I just spent an hour or so mapping out all the assessment that I have to do this semester. I am rather shocked! There are twenty in total over the next 7 weeks. I’ve never thought to do this when I was studying before (ADHD, natch) and now I can see a bit better why some PLANNING may be in order! Especially since I have an advanced presentation due in like, 4 weeks, that I have to research and then present to the lecturers and my fellow advanced students. Eep!

Still, it feels good to be on top of things, roughly, kind of, sort of.

Semester 2 Courses

// July 22nd, 2010 // No Comments » // Science, Study

Here are the courses I’m doing this semester at the University of Sydney, if anyone’s interested:

ANAT2010: Concepts of Neuroanatomy
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function (memory). In essence, the course covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain and its different areas. The practicals offer students the unique opportunity to examine specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum.

BIOL2917 Entomology (Advanced)
This is a general but comprehensive introduction to Insect Biology taught in 3 integrated modules. The first module examines morphology, classification, life histories and development, physiology, ecology, behaviour, conservation, and the biology of prominent members of major groups. The other two modules examine new developments in entomological research, focusing on research strengths at the University of Sydney, the biology of social insects and insect behaviour.

MBLG2972 Molecular Biology and Genetics B (Advanced)
This unit of study shows how modern molecular biology is being applied to the study of the genetics of all life forms from bacteria through to complex multicellular organisms including plants, animals and humans. Lecture topics include classical Mendelian genetics with an emphasis on its molecular basis, cytogenetics, bacterial genetics and evolution, molecular evolution, bioinformatics and genomics, developmental genetics and the techniques and applications of molecular genetics.

PCOL2012 Pharmacology: Drugs and People
This unit of study examines four important areas of Pharmacology: (1) drug action in the nervous system (2) drug discovery and development (3) pharmacotherapy of inflammation, allergy and gut disorders, and (4) drugs of recreation, dependence and addiction. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems. Online quizzes accompany each module.

I start on Monday! Hurrah!

Semester 1, 2010

// February 24th, 2010 // 1 Comment » // Health, Study

I have FINALLY decided what units I am going to do this semester. Not a moment too soon as the semester starts on Monday! I have already got special permission to enrol in 2 senior (3rd year) units and am just waiting on the official stamp of approval for my degree transfer, from Bachelor of Medical Science to Bachelor of Science.

The great thing about this plan is that I don’t need to decide yet what my second major will be (Neuroscience is the first). I can investigate a bit more and then decide before 2nd semester whether it will be Immunology, Cell Pathology or Biology/Genetics.

For those of you who give a stuff, here are the units I’m doing. If you don’t give a stuff, it’s quite understandable!

PCOL2011 – Pharmacology Fundamentals
This unit of study examines four basic areas in Pharmacology: (1) principles of drug action (2) pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism (3) autonomic and endocrine pharmacology, and (4) drug design. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork skills. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems.

IMMU2101 – Introductory Immunology
This unit of study will provide an overview of the human immune system and essential features of immune responses. The lecture course begins with a study of immunology as a basic research science. This includes the nature of the cells and molecules that recognise antigens and how these cells respond at the cellular and molecular levels. Practical/tutorial sessions will illustrate particular concepts introduced in the lecture program. Further lectures and self-directed learning sessions will integrate this fundamental information into studies of mechanisms of host defence against infection, transplantation as well as dysfunction of the immune system including allergy, immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases and cancer.

NEUR3001 – Neuroscience: Special Senses
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system and to the main concepts of processing of sensory information. Understanding basic sensory transduction mechanisms and the function of the sensory systems is necessary to understand how perceptual processes work in normal and disease conditions and provides a gateway to unravel the complexity of the mind. Basic aspects of low and high level sensory processing in all sense modalities will be covered, with a special emphasis in the auditory and visual systems. The relationship between sensory systems, perception and higher cognitive functions will be addressed.

NEUR3002 – Neuroscience: Motor Systems & Behaviour
The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system. Our current knowledge of how the brain works is based on the analysis of the normal structure of the nervous system and its pathways, the functional effects of lesions and neurological diseases in different parts of the nervous system, and the way that nerve cells work at the molecular, cellular and integrative level. This course focuses on to the neural circuits and the mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions. The lecture series addresses the different topics, each of which offers special insight into the function of the nervous system in health and disease.

Now I am just crossing my fingers that the vestibular migraines stay far far away. I’ve got an MRI on Saturday just to rule out any kind of cerebrovascular malformation so they can put me on migraine medication if the migraines come back. I hate MRIs! Luckily my nice neurologist is prescribing me Valium this time. Maybe it’ll even be fun!

Finally, A 2nd Year Student

// February 9th, 2009 // 2 Comments » // Study

I’m gearing up for a new semester of uni – my first as a 100% full-time student. That means FOUR papers this term – haven’t done that many since 1989! Should be interesting.

If anyone is interested, here are the deets. All medical papers this time – no horrible physics or calculus, yay!

BMED2801 – Cell Structure and Function
This unit of study begins with a discussion of the unique morphology of unicellular prokaryotic organisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses) followed by the structure and function of human cells. A strong understanding of cellular structures is essential for an appreciation of whole body function. Basic cell structure is examined by focussing on cell specialisation and tissue organisation in humans. The structure and function of excitable cells such as nerve and muscle will lead to a discussion of membrane potential, synaptic transmission and neuromuscular junction. The unit of study then gives an introduction into how gene expression is regulated during development, and how the cell cycle is controlled to coordinate programmed events such as differentiation and cell death. This allows discussion of the consequences and treatment of abnormal tissue growth (cancer).Practical classes not only complement the lecture material but also introduce students to a wide range of technical skills, tissue processing and bacterial cultivation.

BMED2802 – Molecular Basis of Medical Sciences
This unit of study extends pre-existing understanding of the way in which genetic information is stored, transmitted and expressed. Students will be introduced to the role of enzymes in the catalysis of cellular reactions and the pharmacological strategies employed to exploit our knowledge of these mechanisms is then discussed. Intracellular signalling cascades, cell to cell signalling and pharmacological intervention in these processes is covered. The molecular basis of drug action and the use of DNA technology in drug design will be discussed. Students will then cover the application of medical genetics to the study of advanced gene expression, recombinant technology, cloning and gene products, transgenics and the linkage and mapping of genes including reference to DNA fingerprinting and the human genome project and gene therapy. The technical skills taught in the practical classes include the use of restriction enzymes, the separation of DNA molecules using electrophoresis, the inspection of chromosomes, linkage mapping, gene transfer and the measurement of gene expression.

BMED2803 – Cardiac, Respiratory and Renal Function
The maintenance of constant conditions in the human body is dependent on thousands of intricate control mechanisms. This unit of study examines many of those homeostatic processes with specific reference to major apparatus such as the respiratory, cardiovascular and renal. The structure and function of the cardiovascular system is discussed and cardiac output, blood pressure and blood flow are studied. Discussion of the respiratory system embraces the structure of the respiratory organs and description of the mechanism of the transport of gases to and from cells. Similar treatment of the renal system involves anatomical and histological investigation of kidney structure and a physiological description of kidney function. Practical classes are designed to nurture the same generic attributes taught in BMED2801 and BMED2802 but, in addition, students are introduced to a wide range of anatomical and physiological technical skills. Specifically, students will investigate the structure and function of the heart and blood vessels, the components of the respiratory system and the kidney – all at the cellular and organ level. Students will also conduct experiments (often on themselves) which show how heart rate and blood pressure are controlled, how breathing is regulated and how urine output is modulated in response to both physiological and pharmacological stimuli.

BMED2806 – Sensory and Motor Functions
This unit of study examines how neural and motor systems are adapted to sense and respond to changes in the external environment. After consideration of the basic anatomical organisation of the nervous and sensory systems, the way in which nerve signals are integrated and coordinated in response to external stimuli are covered in more detail. Various senses such as vision, touch and hearing are studied, together with a discussion on motor reflexes. The receptors involved in normal modes of communications are discussed before specific examples such as the fright and flight and stress responses are considered. This is complemented by discussion of the effects of drugs on the nervous system, with special reference to pain and analgesics. An appreciation is gained of how toxins and infections can perturb the normal neuromuscular co-ordination. Thus, pharmacological and pathological considerations, such as the use of poisoned arrows and muscle paralysis and viral and tetanus infections, are studied in concert with relevant physiological concepts.In practical classes, students perform experiments (often on themselves) to illustrate the functioning of the senses and motor control and coordination involving both stretch and flexor reflexes. In addition, students extend their anatomical expertise by examining the structure and function of the nervous system and the skeleton (especially the vertebral column, the thorax and the limbs). Practical sessions also include the effects of analgesics on experimental pain and case studies of tetanus and botulism.

The Month That Was

// June 27th, 2008 // No Comments » // Kids, Life, Study

Well, June was a bit of a write off in terms of blogging. I had end-of-semester exams which pretty much took up every spare moment. The physics exam went pretty well I thought, but calculus was a nightmare! An hour and a half is not enough time for an examination!! I didn’t finish it and am pretty sure that I failed, unless everyone else did really badly as well. Never mind! There’s got to be one paper that you are severely tested on, and Calculus is definitely mine. If I have to repeat it at summer school, so be it.

Yesterday I slipped over on a piece of Lego (thanks, kids!) and whacked my forearm really hard on the wooden arm of the sofa. It really fracking hurt and was very tender, so I got Jan to take me to the hospital, just in case. Embarrassingly, it didn’t even hurt by the time I got there (after having ice on it on the way there!) The doctor was very nice to me though. It is still very tender today and gets a bit sore if I use the computer for too long. Still, I predict a full recovery!

Excited this weekend about my first weekend with no studying for a long time! It’s my Aunt Deborah’s 60th birthday and we are going out for a big family dinner tomorrow night which I am very much looking forward to. We even have a babysitter! Also we are going to see Kung Fu Panda tomorrow morning – Archie has been looking forward to it for about two months and watching the trailer on the internet at least ten times a day. Should be good!

Valence Emily

// December 9th, 2005 // No Comments » // Science, Study

I had a great time at my Chemistry class last night. I’m really into it now, and actually enjoying the whole process of learning. Still haven’t quite memorised the damn periodic table though!

Now I’m thinking about possible future careers… all still a pipe dream but we’ll see what happens.

Better Living Through Chemistry

// October 28th, 2005 // 1 Comment » // Science, Study

I’ve been swotting up on chemistry a little and I found a good resource at about.com. It includes some chemistry safety recommendations:

Dress Appropriately (for chemistry lab, not fashion or the weather)
No sandals, no clothes you love more than life, no contact lenses, and long pants are preferable to shorts or short skirts. Tie long hair back. Wear safety goggles and a lab coat. Even if you aren’t clumsy, someone else in the lab probably is. If you take even a few chemistry courses you will probably see people set themselves on fire, spill acid on themselves, others, or notes, splash themselves in the eye, etc. Don’t be the bad example to others, remembered for all time for something stupid!

Don’t Play Mad Scientist
Don’t haphazardly mix chemicals! Pay attention to the order in which chemicals are to be added to each other and do not deviate from the instructions.

Perhaps chemistry is not the best discipline for me as I have a formidable reputation for clumsiness, or as Lucy Lawless once put it, “I’m an unko”. As does my darling sister.